The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Jul 2017

Open Access Special Issue on The productivity and profitability of small scale communal irrigation systems in South-eastern Africa

An open access special issue on The productivity and profitability of small scale communal irrigation systems in South-eastern Africa has been published in the International Journal of Water Resources Development. These 11 articles on small scale irrigation include: an exploration of the profitability and productivity barriers and opportunities; case studies from each of the three countries; an overview of extension use; income inequality; a soil water and solute learning system; the theory and application of Agricultural Innovation Platforms; policy barriers and opportunities for enhanced productivity; and an overview article on findings on productivity and profitability.

The research finds that if irrigation systems are to successfully secure food supplies under a changing climate, donors must invest in better scheme management rather than only investing in infrastructure. You can access the full volume or individual articles by visiting http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cijw20/33/5. Read More...
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New Publication on Transboundary Water Cooperation

A new article entitled Improving governance in transboundary cooperation in water and climate change adaptation has come out in the journal "Water Policy." The authors examine the complexities of transboundary water governance in the face of climate change while simultaneously providing examples of lessons learned from almost a decade of cooperation on transboundary climate adaptation in water management under the UNECE Water Convention. The 63 lessons learned are also put into the context of the OECD principles on water governance. The paper concludes that developing climate change adaptation measures needs to improve in parallel the water governance system at transboundary scale.

You can find the publication online here.
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AGWA Updates: July 2017

We have just released the July issue of our AGWA Updates newsletter -- available here. Take note of the important announcement regarding the Steering Committee nominations as well as dates listed for our Annual Meeting and other World Water Week events. This is a particularly large issue. In spite of it being summer in many parts of the globe, there is a tremendous amount happening in the worlds of climate and water -- from policy to science to finance, and everything in between. We also highlight upcoming events, lots of recent publications, and several funding opportunities. Enjoy! Read More...
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UNESCO-IHP Survey on Youth Employment in the Water Sector

UNESCO-IHP is currently conducting an online survey on “Youth employment and unemployment in the water sector” with the objective of learning more about the employment challenges that affect youth and young professionals within the water sector. The results will inform water-related policy recommendations and programme activities of UNESCO.

This survey is open to anyone aged between 15 and 40, and involved in the water sector. Participation is voluntary and information provided will remain anonymous.

Click here to participate in the survey!
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OOSKAnews Interviews on Climate-Water Intersect

OOSKAnews has conducted a series of video interviews exploring the intersects between planetary climate change and the world’s water challenges. The videos feature various professionals from the water and climate communities, providing scientific and policy perspectives on a number of issues. This interview series is produced in association with the World Water Council and the #ClimateIsWater alliance (of which AGWA is a part). Below you'll find some of the recent episodes.
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Young Water Fellowship Call for Applications

The Young Water Fellowship Program aims to empower young leaders from low and middle income countries to implement projects to tackle water, sanitation & hygiene (WASH), water pollution and water scarcity issues, by offering them an intensive training program, seed funding grants for their projects, and mentoring support by senior level experts during one year.

This program will select 10 young community leaders capable of successfully designing and implementing sustainable and inclusive water projects that significantly improve living conditions in their communities, while contributing to the achievement of SDG #6 (water and sanitation for all). Applicants must be 18-30 years old at the time of the applications and come from a list of low and mid income countries. Specific conditions for application can be found on the YWF website.
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Guest Blog | Announcement of US Withdrawal from the Paris Agreement: What are the Consequences?

This guest blog was written by Soléne Fabrégas, Program Officer and Coordinator of the Climate Working Group at the French Water Partnership. The article comes from FWP's Water & Climate News Digest.

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Following the dramatic announcement that the United States is withdrawing from the Paris Agreement, concerns regarding the future of international negotiations and our capacity to combat climate change are greater than ever.

Although a number of reassuring speeches have indicated that such a decision could both encourage nations to take action and stimulate momentum in civil society, the negative consequences could be numerous:
  • From a symbolic point of view, the withdrawal from the agreement of the world’s second biggest producer of greenhouse gases gives out a very negative signal. Since Donald Trump’s election, the United States had already announced multiple measures that go against sustainable development and a low-carbon economy (e.g. drastic cuts in environmental credits, re-examination of the Clean Power Act, etc.). Now, however, the US President clearly intends to let the world know that he no longer wants to contribute to a joint effort that is nevertheless indispensible to respect international targets.
    By undoing the efforts made by Barack Obama’s administration to limit the USA’s production of greenhouse gases, the federal state is extinguishing the last hope of remaining under the 2°C threshold. As a reminder, the sum of nationally determined contributions (NDCs) submitted by nations for the Paris agreement currently corresponds to an estimated average temperature rise of between 2.7°C and 3.5°C by 2100. A significant revision and stepping up of nations’ ambitions is therefore crucial, rather than the opposite. In its latest note, the Comité 21 (network for all French actors working for sustainability) states “The impacts of this decision will really be felt after 2020 with a rise in emissions from coal, and a slow-down in the production of renewable energy due to a lack of incentives from the EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency)”.
    The issue of funding is also crucial. Climate funds (adaptation funds, green funds, etc.) are vital tools to help countries initiate processes for energy transition and adapt to climate change. Although the USA’s promise to contribute 3 billion dollars to the Green Climate Fund may not seem like much, the withdrawal of this financing would have the effect of weakening a financial tool that already struggles to find resources. In addition to multilateral funding, we can also apprehend a drop in development aid from the United States, bearing in mind that numerous funded development projects also play a part in combating climate change and reducing vulnerabilities.
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