The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Africa

Open Access Special Issue on The productivity and profitability of small scale communal irrigation systems in South-eastern Africa

An open access special issue on The productivity and profitability of small scale communal irrigation systems in South-eastern Africa has been published in the International Journal of Water Resources Development. These 11 articles on small scale irrigation include: an exploration of the profitability and productivity barriers and opportunities; case studies from each of the three countries; an overview of extension use; income inequality; a soil water and solute learning system; the theory and application of Agricultural Innovation Platforms; policy barriers and opportunities for enhanced productivity; and an overview article on findings on productivity and profitability.

The research finds that if irrigation systems are to successfully secure food supplies under a changing climate, donors must invest in better scheme management rather than only investing in infrastructure. You can access the full volume or individual articles by visiting http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cijw20/33/5. Read More...
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Enhancing the climate resilience of Africa's infrastructure: the power and water sectors

Africa has experienced economic growth of more than 5 percent per annum during the past decade, but to sustain this growth, investment in infrastructure is fundamental. Much of these investments will support the construction of long-lived infrastructure (for example, dams, power stations, and irrigation canals), which will be vulnerable to the potentially harsher climate of the future. Enhancing the climate resilience of Africa's infrastructure: the power and water sectors is the first book to use a consistent approach across river basins and power systems in Africa, including a comprehensive, broad set of state-of-the-art climate projections to evaluate the risks posed by climate change to planned investments in Africa’s water, and power sectors.

This book has been published as part of the Africa Development Forum Series sponsored by the Agence Française de Développement and the World Bank.
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Morocco strives to maintain political support for water within the climate change agenda

Morocco strives to maintain political support for water within the climate change agenda
This article was written by AGWA Policy Group members Maggie White (French Water Partnership, Coalition Eau, Eau Vive) and Louise Whiting (WaterAid)
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Photo by John Matthews

Just six months after the signing of the Paris Agreement, Morocco and France have kept the promise made at COP21 to highlight water’s critical role when it comes to addressing climate change – including both the reduction of carbon emissions and adapting our societies to the climatic impacts that are now inevitable.

The key role that water plays in both adaptation and mitigation was acknowledged by the majority of countries that signed the Paris Agreement, as evidenced through the content of their nationally determined contributions (NDCs). In fact, 83 percent of the NDCs that have been submitted highlight the importance of adaptation – especially in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and Pacific-Asia – and 93 percent of the adaptation content refers to water as fundamental to effective adaptation programmes (1). It is beyond question that water is central to the successful implementation of the Paris Agreement.

It was therefore essential that just before COP22, the COP Presidency chose to support, promote and lead an event on addressing climate change in Africa specifically from a water perspective.

The International Conference on Water and Climate: water security for climatic justice (2) was co-organised on the 11-12th of July by the Government of Morocco, the Government of France, the World Water Council and with the support of the French Water Partnership. The event fell under the high patronage of his majesty the King of Morocco, Mohammed VI, and was fully supported by the head of the Moroccan government. With over 600 participants in attendance, and more than 20 African ministerial delegations, the conference was a huge success in terms of building the much-needed political awareness of the role of water in the battle against climate change.

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