The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Green Bonds as Financial Instruments for NDC Implementation

On 17 July the UNDP NDC Support Programme hosted a webinar on "Green Bonds as Financial Instruments for NDC Implementation." A video of the event, including presentations, is now available online.

The event provides a brief overview of the topic of green bonds, barriers for international debt capital markets to invest in a consistent manner into emerging markets, how aggregation of project assets and refinancing through proceeds of green bonds can accelerate NDC implementation. It considers structures that can be designed for replication across countries. This is accompanied by three inspiring examples of how such investment structures can work in practice.
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Call for expressions of interest in UNFCCC Regional Climate Weeks

The Regional Climate Weeks are organized by the UNFCCC secretariat with the Nairobi Framework Partnership partner agencies and hosted by different Governments in three regions throughout the year. They are so far organized in Africa, the Asia Pacific and in Latin America and the Caribbean. The goal of Regional Climate Weeks is to support Parties in the implementation of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals by mobilizing stakeholders across the region.
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OOSKAnews Voices: "Too Much, Too Quickly": UNFCCC COP23 and the Sharpening Mind

OOSKAnews Voices is a series of guest “opinion columns” on water, written by senior participants in different parts of the international water community. The columns provide a global platform for organizations and individuals to promulgate their views and messages. In this piece, AGWA's Coordinator John H. Matthews focuses on the time-sensitive need to scale up adaptation efforts globally. Dr. Matthews provides reflections on COP23, highlighting its flaws and merits while outlining the urgent need for both practical and policy advancements.

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"I have attended five COPs since 2009. Frankly, most of the COPs are frustrating to attend. But COP23 is the first UNFCCC meeting where fear was palpable in the presentations I saw and in the people I met. Climate impacts were here, they were serious, and many impacts were actually frightening. In the words of one participant with a large government’s aid agency: 'Climate change is coming too fast and too hard. We’re not changing fast enough. And we need help.' I sensed that many individuals and institutions felt as if their options were narrowing. Adaptation used to be about projects or money and budgets. Now adaptation is a systemic need, an institutional threat..."
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Life-hacking water challenges: making low energy, low carbon utilities happen

This guest blog was written by Eva Promes, Programmes Officer, Cities for the Future at the International Water Association (IWA).

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There is no shortage of challenges these days. The tiny day-to-day ones, such as untangling your earphones are easily relatable and normally resolved with a quick fix. Big global water challenges are a whole other story. The problems related to climate change are so big that often people struggle to grasp the solutions.
wind turbines


There seems no easy solution for achieving targets such as defined in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), or the National Determined Contributions (NDCs) that aim to limit the impacts of climate change. However, there is general consensus that time is running out to secure safe water and sanitation services for all. So what can we, in the water sector, do to bring these global targets within reach?
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Policy Group's New Briefing Document: Water a success factor for implementing the Paris Agreement

The AGWA policy group, coordinated by SIWI, has released a new policy brief outlining successful steps towards implementation of the Paris Agreement.

One of the keys to fulfill the goals set in the Paris Agreement will be wise water management. Water was on the agenda at the UN Climate Change Conference in Marrakesh (COP22), and its key role in strengthening resilience to climate change cannot be overstated. The role of water holds great potential for synergies in adaptation and mitigation, as illustrated in the priorities outlined in the national climate plans. In this policy brief, developed by members of the AGWA policy group, recommendations on how water can inform the implementation of the Paris Agreement, illustrated through its role in the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) are presented.

You can find out more on the AGWA Policy Group by visiting our Policy page.
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From Bonn to Marrakech - The Role of Water in Ongoing Climate Discussions

This guest blog was written by AGWA Policy Group members Maggie White (French Water Partnership) and Sofia Widforss (SIWI)

The "spirit of Paris" — transparency, inclusiveness and flexibility — was on everyone’s minds during the Pre-Cop meeting that took place in Bonn at the UNFCCC headquarters from 16-26 May. A sense of purposeful urgency was in the air. Participants sought to continue the positive dynamics of Paris that promoted involvement of all stakeholders, leaving "no one behind," and inciting countries to ratify quickly so that the Agreement could also enter into force earlier. "The world is looking upon us and we cannot disappoint it."

During the UNFCCC Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA) and Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI) meetings, the constructive tone from Paris was present. An optimistic spirit was in the hallways — a willingness to build on the Paris Agreement (PA), albeit facing a complex process ahead. Shifting from an agreement-focus towards an implementation-focus, adaptation has replaced mitigation as the centre of attention. Water, as the key element mentioned in most Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and essential for adaptation measures, was mentioned in many different contexts (e.g., linked to sustainable business and agriculture, gender and human rights, as well as to funding). Read More...
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