The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

RAMSAR

Joint Statement on Ecosystem-based Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction

The thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD CoP 13) is currently taking place in Cancun, Mexico. The CBD CoP runs from 4 - 17 December 2016.

December 6th was designated as Climate Change Day at the Conference of Parties. To mark the occasion, the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands prepared a joint statement with UNDP, the European Commission, and the Partnership for Environment and Disaster Risk Reduction (PEDRR).

You can view or download the joint statement here.
Read More...
Comments

Guest Blog | Wetland Restoration improves livelihoods in developing cities

Wetland Restoration improves livelihoods in developing cities
by Rob Cadmus (Ramsar Convention Secretariat), Chris Percival (The South Pole Group), and Ania Grobicki (Acting Secretary General, Ramsar Convention Secretariat)

---

Much of our increasingly urban world takes access to clean water for granted, viewing it as an inexhaustible resource. Yet today, hundreds of millions of people will go without clean water and one out of three people will not have access to proper sanitation (WHO & UNICEF, 2015). In 2010, more urban dwellers were without access to water services than in 2000 (De Castro Zoratto & Ivins, 2015), and it is estimated that by 2050 the global demand for water will increase by 55% (WWAP, 2015). Meeting basic water needs will continue to be a challenge.

As people have migrated from rural areas to urban centers in hope of jobs and education, cities have expanded outwards and in many cases have degraded the waterways and wetlands that surround them, resulting in polluted water with the worst conditions felt by the poor and disadvantaged. This cycle of expansion and degradation is seen throughout the world, but is particularly striking in some of the least developed countries where informal settlements and slums have sprawled faster than basic services. Nearly 900 million people will live in slums by 2020 (WHO & UN-Habitat, 2010), and in developing countries 90% of sewage is discharged untreated into water bodies (Corcoran et al., 2010). In many of these informal settlements, pollution and open sewers contaminate water, resulting in disease and deaths. The UN estimates that approximately 3.5 million people die each year as a result of inadequate water, sanitation, and hygiene (UN Water, 2013). Further, these populations are often the most vulnerable to natural disasters, food shortages, and the impacts of climate change. Read More...
Comments

Guest Blog | Wetlands: The Hidden Resource for Climate Mitigation and Adaptation



Wetlands: The Hidden Resource for Climate Mitigation and Adaptation
by Chris Perceval (left), Head of Strategy and Partnerships at the Ramsar Convention, and Rob Cadmus (right), Manager, Investing in Natural Infrastructure at the Ramsar Convention

The Convention on Wetlands, called the Ramsar Convention, is an intergovernmental treaty that provides the framework for national action and international cooperation for the conservation and wise use of wetlands and their resources. The Ramsar Convention and its Contracting Parties commit to work towards the wise use of all the wetlands and water resources in their territory, through national plans, policies and legislation, management actions and public education. In this article the authors discuss the importance and hidden value of wetlands as a resource in both climate mitigation and adaptation.

---

Wetlands – areas of land that meet water – are among the most productive and valuable ecosystems. They are fundamentally important for supporting sustainable development and combatting climate change. Between now and the end of the year, the world’s governments will meet to discuss the global agendas for both sustainable development and climate change. They would do well to remember the contribution that these critical ecosystems can make. Read More...
Comments