The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Infrastructure

IAIA17: Impact Assessment’s Contribution to the Global Efforts in Addressing Climate Change

Climate change represents a key challenge to the sustainability of global ecosystems and human prosperity in the 21st century. Climate change goes beyond project impacts, as it affects many diverse global issues: from water, food, and energy security to impacts on human rights and vulnerable peoples. Global climate change raises important questions of international and intergenerational justice.

Impact Assessment (IA) science and practice are strongly challenged by climate change. IA will contribute to ensuring that future development outcomes are not jeopardized by present-day decisions, and to identifying resilient adaptation measures to reduce and manage the adverse effects of climate change. The IAIA17 Conference will cover the cutting edge of IA information, best practices, success stories, innovations, and lessons learned with delegates from all over the world.

AGWA members will be attending the conference and leading a theme forum entitled "Standardizing Uncertainty: Systematic Approaches to Climate Resilience for Water Security."
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A Green Future for Muni Bonds: What to know about green water bonds

This webinar hosted by Ceres will give water service providers an overview of green bonds—a new class of municipal bonds—and their applicability for financing water utility projects. Municipal bonds have always played an important role in financing local water projects. As communities, infrastructure and the climate itself changes, the municipal bond financing landscape is changing as well. Green bonds are an emerging financing tool for water projects that meet the everyday needs of communities in a sustainable and resilient manner. Read More...

CDKN Webinar: Natural Hazard Risks for Infrastructure in El Salvador

El Salvador is the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America, with 69% of its 6 million people living in cities. The highly degraded state of the natural resources means that El Salvador is one of the least self-sufficient countries in terms of food security, and it is also recognised as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world, with 90% of the territory located in areas of high risk to natural disasters (UN Disaster Assessment and Coordination, 2010).

In response to a request by the Government of El Salvador, CDKN and its partners aim to identify the risks presented by a range of natural hazards on the key infrastructure in the country. Their goal is to develop a national framework for infrastructure risk assessment using the best available information, produce initial estimates of the level of risk, and support the development of a sustainable collaboration across agencies responsible for infrastructure to further develop and refine the framework and estimates for use within core development policy analysis and decision making. Join them in this webinar to learn more about the initial results of this project and the implications going forward. Read More...