The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

New Episode of #ClimateReady Podcast | Picking Your Climate Battles: When Is Managed Retreat the Best Option?

What happens when climate change renders our homes and communities uninhabitable? Can we maintain our deep place-based connections from afar? As climate change and sea level rise threaten coastal communities, we’re forced to grapple with the fact that not all places will be livable in the not-so-distant future. Following extreme weather events, conversations tend to focus on how to build back. But should we always build back? Who decides? The concept of strategic managed retreat — although controversial — is slowly making its way into the mainstream as a viable, and necessary, adaptation option for many communities threatened by mounting climate impacts.

In this episode of ClimateReady, we hear from Dr. A.R. Siders as she makes the case for strategic and managed retreat as an opportunity to focus on the long-term well-being of coastal and floodplain communities and the lands they call home (http://bit.ly/2RIqRBC). Retreat is not an adaptation solution for every context. But when done in a purposeful, coordinated manner coupled with community involvement, it offers the potential for minimizing risks while avoiding the pitfalls of ad hoc displacement following disasters - a fate that often disproportionately affects poor and marginalized communities with the fewest resources to rebuild or relocate. We discuss the cultural barriers and social justice implications of the approach, and lots more, in this wide-ranging interview.

The show concludes with a “Climate of Hope” story as we hear from our youngest guest ever. Austin Matthews, the son of ClimateReady’s producer, describes what it’s like to be a ten-year-old facing the looming threat of climate change and some of the reasons for his optimism facing the challenge.
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AGWA Updates: February 2020

We have just released the latest issue of AGWA Updates, our internal e-newsletter. You can access the February issue by clicking here. You'll want to check out this issue to learn about the incredible amount of activity taking place within the AGWA network. As always it is full of the latest news on the intersection of climate and water from the fields of climate change adaptation, climate finance, policy, and much more. Stay updated! Stay informed!

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World Fish Migration Day 2020

This guest blog was written by Roxanne Diaz, World Fish Migration Foundation Communications Manager.
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Love-Flows
Migratory fishes are a strong, remarkable group of species. There are more than 1,100 freshwater species which migrate a distance of more than 100 km; some swim over 11,000 km over the course of their lifetimes. They navigate using the currents, magnetic fields, and with their sense of taste and smell. Migratory fish are a crucial link in the food chain and play an important role in creating healthy and productive river systems.

They support billions of people around the world who depend on them for food, sport, research and intrigue. Because of this, we need to ensure the survival of these species for generations to come. But many times, fishes do not receive the proper attention they deserve.

To raise the awareness of these overlooked species, the World Fish Migration Foundation coordinates World Fish Migration Day every two years. World Fish Migration Day is a one-day global celebration to improve the public's understanding of the importance of migratory fish and free-flowing rivers and how to reduce our impacts on them. On this day, thousands of organizations, schools, aquariums, zoos and communities organize their local events to educate and excite people about migratory fish species and our collective reliance on healthy free-flowing rivers.
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New Episode of #ClimateReady Podcast | Lessons from Chiloé, Chile: Transforming Natural Resource Governance Amid Environmental Change

Environmental change is not occurring in isolation, especially for communities and groups who may live close to and depend very directly on local ecosystems for their livelihoods and economic wellbeing. Climate change in most places is occurring in conjunction with cultural shifts, political reorganization, and globalizing economic impacts. While economic, environmental, and social change tended to happen gradually in the past, many regions are now struggling with managing a bewildering array of forces, many of which they have little control over, forcing difficult decisions whose implications may be hard to manage much less foresee. Governance — especially around management of natural resources — must evolve in order to better address the interests of a growing number of stakeholders in increasingly complex socio-environmental systems.

Fieldwork-Chile
In this episode of ClimateReady, we bring in environmental anthropologist Dr. Sarah Ebel to discuss an ongoing example of transformative governance in Chile. Drawing on nearly a decade of work with coastal fishing communities, Dr. Ebel describes how legislative changes to Chile’s fisheries management plans and a rare shift towards “polycentric governance” have impacted local fishermen, indigenous groups, the aquaculture industry, and the environment — topics she further covers in the book Chiloé. We also discuss the role of “individual agency” in our quest towards resilience and much more.

The show concludes with another “Climate of Hope” story as part of an ongoing collaboration with the World Youth Parliament for Water, where Alex Whitebrook highlights encouraging trends from China’s industrial and agricultural sectors.
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AGWA Updates: January 2020

We have just released the latest issue of AGWA Updates, our internal e-newsletter. You can access the January issue by clicking here. You'll want to check out this issue to learn about the incredible amount of activity taking place within the AGWA network. As always it is full of the latest news on the intersection of climate and water from the fields of climate change adaptation, climate finance, policy, and much more. Stay updated! Stay informed!

To subscribe to our newsletter, sign up here. Read More...
Comments