The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Green Infrastructure

New Episode of #ClimateReady Podcast | Utilities of the Future, Today: How Public Utilities are Pioneering Climate-Smart Infrastructure

We count on public utilities to provide services integral to everyday life. When we turn on the tap or flip a light switch, the assumption is that water will run and rooms will light up. But as the climate changes and cities continue to grow at a breakneck pace, what can utilities do to continue to provide these essential services? Is there a way to avoid overexploiting natural resources while keeping ratepayers happy?

For insight into climate-smart development, we look to the pioneering efforts of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) in the U.S. state of California. On this episode of ClimateReady, we’ll hear from three SFPUC representatives: Mike Brown, Sarah Minick, and Karri Ving. They describe the ways in which SFPUC is utilizing — and financing — nature-based “green” infrastructure to reinforce and supplement their existing systems in order to provide water, wastewater, and power services to millions of customers in a region highly vulnerable to climate change. In the second part of the discussion, we hear how SFPUC is financing these innovative projects — totaling over US$1.4 billion — through the use of the world’s first certified climate bonds dedicated to water infrastructure.

Following the interview, we wrap up with another installment of “Climate of Hope” in partnership with the World Youth Parliament for Water. Karan Gajare, a civil engineer from India pursuing a Masters Degree in Environmental Engineering through an Erasmus Mundus program, shares a success story of a small village taking big steps to adapt to and mitigate climate change in his native India (full story at http://bit.ly/38tc9F7).
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Corporate Water Stewardship and the Case for Green Infrastructure

Private sector investment in green infrastructure can reduce water-related risks and provide multiple co-benefits while helping companies achieve water-stewardship goals. ​

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The next few decades of global water infrastructure investment will be transformative, and the choices that both public and private sector actors make now may determine if the global water crisis that looms in today’s headlines will have been a harbinger of things to come or a turning point. This report from Conservation International makes the case for private sector investment in green infrastructure as part of a broader water stewardship approach that benefits companies, stakeholders in watersheds where those companies operate and source their materials, and the global community committed to sustainable development.
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OOSKAnews Voices | Feeling the Power of Climate Change: What Is Green Hydropower in a Shifting Climate?

OOSKAnews Voices is a new series of guest “opinion columns” on water, written by senior participants in different parts of the international water community. The columns provide a global platform for organizations and individuals to promulgate their views and messages. In this piece John H. Matthews, co-founder and secretariat coordinator for AGWA, takes a look at the controversy over how "green" hydrolectric power really is.

"Perhaps more than any other water-related topic, hydropower represents some of the most extreme risks and opportunities associated with climate change policy and practice..." Read More...
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Bringing Nature Back - New Documentary

As climate change takes hold in the Mekong region, the worst effects will be manifested through water.

ICEM's new documentary – Bringing Nature Back – illustrates the benefits of using green infrastructure and bioengineering to build climate resilience in the Mekong Region.

With climate change, the Mekong Region can expect to see more severe droughts, increased floods, and heavy storms. To mitigate the impacts of these events and build climate resilience, we will have to re-envision how we practice infrastructure development. We will have to bring nature back. Read More...
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#ClimateIsWater - Green Infrastructure & Investing in Sustainability

In the ninth episode of the #ClimateIsWater series is Todd Gartner, Senior Associate and Manager of the Natural Infrastructure for Water Project at World Resources Institute (wri.org/our-work/project/natural-infrastructure-water). This episode focuses on the potential of green infrastructure to serve as a solution to some of climate change's impacts. Todd also discusses how we can better manage our water resources and think about infrastructure investments in the face of an uncertain future and a new climate reality.

Make sure to check out this episode and keep checking on the AGWA Blog and the #ClimateIsWater Vimeo Channel for future installments.

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Building Water Security Through Green Infrastructure

Science magazine is publishing a series of six Policy Forum essays on water to coincide with leading annual water conference, World Water Week. The 3-part series of paired essays contrasts perspectives on water governance (local vs global), monitoring water (satellite vs on the ground), and green infrastructure (feasibility for emerging economies). An essay advocating for the wider deployment of green infrastructure was co-authored by John Matthews and others from AGWA. Dr. Margaret Palmer, head of the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), served as lead author for the essay. You can see the article online via the Science website or directly download it here. The counterpoint to this essay on green infrastructure is also available to download here. Read More...
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