The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Infrastructure

Water Resources IMPACT 2018 Article of the Year Announced

American Water Resources Association (AWRA) selects inaugural Water Resources IMPACT magazine Article of the Year winner, names two runners-up.

MIDDLEBURG, VA, March 26, 2019

The American Water Resources Association (AWRA) is pleased to announce that "Climate Change: Resilient Infrastructure or Infrastructure for Resilience?" written by John Matthews and published in the November 2018 issue is winner of the Water Resources IMPACT magazine 2018 Article of the Year.

In nominating this article one of the editors wrote, “Matthews’ engaging writing style draws in the reader, asks critical questions, and promotes multidisciplinary approaches.”

"Many, many thanks for this," responded Matthews, lead and co-founder of the Alliance for Global Water Adaptation (AGWA), chaired by the World Bank and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and a senior water Fellow at Colorado State University. "I'm so honored to be nominated, much less to have achieved article of the year. Resilience may be the newest, most important (and least understood) concept for water management today. Practical lessons for resilience water management -- what we need to do differently in light of climate change -- are here already, but often those examples are not where we're used to finding them. Now is the time for us to draw on the global pool of examples and reach across traditional boundaries to achieve the non-traditional solutions we need today."

Download Matthews' winning article here.

The evaluation process also revealed two articles that tied for second place:

"Endangered by Injustice: The Human Right to Water in the United States," by Susan Lea Smith, March 2018, IMPACT.
"Integrating Law, Science and a Path Forward: Opportunities for Collective Action in a Time of Change," by Lara B. Fowler, and Robert T. Caccese, November 2018, IMPACT.

Download runners-up articles here.
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