The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

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Investing in Water: Infrastructure + Technology

This article was written by Zara Amer, CEO, The Climate Change Project
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Climate change will be felt through water
Climate change will be felt through water as it alters the quality, amount, distribution and timing of available water. By 2025, one in every two people on the planet will live with water stress. For one in nine, the problem is already here. ⁣

All our existing water problems will be significantly exacerbated by climate change which is already having a measurable effect on the water cycle. Ecosystems, industries and communities will be affected as the global water crisis intensifies.⁣

In an attempt to better understand how the global water sector was evolving to meet the global water challenge, I produced and recently published the
Investing in Water: Infrastructure + Technology report. Over the course of 7 interviews I spoke with experts about the water infrastructure investment gap, the cost of the global water challenge, and we discussed how new technologies are changing the way in which water is being managed and used.

The small investing he still does is all focussed on one commodity: water
In 2017, I wrote a blog called
The Business of Water, inspired by the end credits of the movie The Big Short. ⁣

The semantics inferred a very bleak, unbalanced view of the future and in order to better understand that future I decided to produce a report that explored how Dr Michael Burry was investing in water. ⁣

That report was going to be called
Investing in Water Rich Farmland. Five research calls in my focus shifted from almond farms, high net worth investors and the secretive world of family offices to the kind of water investing that might serve a greater purpose and benefit everyone.
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Robust, flexible management of rivers, watersheds, groundwater, and wetlands can enable communities to thrive in a shifting climate

Wellspring_cover
Climate change presents a new range of threats, drivers, and uncertainties in how we interact with freshwater ecosystems, but recently developed approaches to cope with climate impacts will ensure that source waters can survive — and thrive — into the future, according to a new report published by The Nature Conservancy (TNC), in collaboration with the Global Resilience Partnership and the Alliance for Global Water Adaptation (AGWA).

“Water is our connector — linking cities, businesses, infrastructure, energy, agriculture, and disaster prevention. If we can make our water choices resilient, we can prepare all these sectors for future impacts,” says John Matthews, Executive Director of AGWA and lead author of Wellspring: Source Water Resilience and Climate Adaptation. “Assumptions that future climate and hydrological conditions will be similar to the past no longer apply. Actions that represented best practices five year ago we now know could lock us into bad decisions that could hurt our economies and ecosystems for decades.”
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CRIDA Teaser Video and Download Link

How do we make better informed decisions for water management given future uncertainty? How can we mainstream robust, flexible approaches? And how can we institutionalize these methods into consistent, replicable outcomes?

CRIDA -- Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis -- provides stepwise planning guidance for water resources planners and managers to implement resilient water management globally, with a strong ecological element.

Just published by UNESCO and written through a partnership with Deltares, the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM), the Rijkswaterstaat, The World Bank, Alliance for Global Water Adaptation (AGWA), and many others, including strong support from Colorado State Water Center, The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), and the Millennium Challenge Corporation. CRIDA has already been applied in more than a dozen projects, across five continents.

Download your copy today!
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The 2018 New Climate Economy report

The 2018 report of the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate is now available online to view or download. The New Climate Economy finds that bold action on climate could deliver US$26 trillion in economic benefits to 2030 (cumulative) compared with business-as-usual. It highlights the momentum already underway, the urgent need for acceleration, and the key actions that would achieve this acceleration – in 5 key economic systems including water.
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Yearbook of Global Climate Action 2017

The Yearbook of Global Climate Action was launched today at a high level GCA event during COP23. The Marrakech Partnership’s 2017 Yearbook of Climate Action, drawing from thematic and regional meetings, summarizes the achievements in climate action over the last year.

The Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action was launched in COP22 in Marrakech to provide a strong roadmap for the UNFCCC process to catalyze and support climate action by Parties and non-Party stakeholders in the period from 2017 to 2020. The partnerships and initiatives of non-Party stakeholders, through the Marrakech Partnership, and in cooperation with national governments, aim to take immediate action on climate, consistent with the full implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

This Yearbook demonstrates that non-Party stakeholders are steadily progressing with climate action.
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