The Policy & Practice of Climate Change & Water

Water Infrastructure

New Episode of #ClimateReady Podcast | Utilities of the Future, Today: How Public Utilities are Pioneering Climate-Smart Infrastructure

We count on public utilities to provide services integral to everyday life. When we turn on the tap or flip a light switch, the assumption is that water will run and rooms will light up. But as the climate changes and cities continue to grow at a breakneck pace, what can utilities do to continue to provide these essential services? Is there a way to avoid overexploiting natural resources while keeping ratepayers happy?

For insight into climate-smart development, we look to the pioneering efforts of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) in the U.S. state of California. On this episode of ClimateReady, we’ll hear from three SFPUC representatives: Mike Brown, Sarah Minick, and Karri Ving. They describe the ways in which SFPUC is utilizing — and financing — nature-based “green” infrastructure to reinforce and supplement their existing systems in order to provide water, wastewater, and power services to millions of customers in a region highly vulnerable to climate change. In the second part of the discussion, we hear how SFPUC is financing these innovative projects — totaling over US$1.4 billion — through the use of the world’s first certified climate bonds dedicated to water infrastructure.

Following the interview, we wrap up with another installment of “Climate of Hope” in partnership with the World Youth Parliament for Water. Karan Gajare, a civil engineer from India pursuing a Masters Degree in Environmental Engineering through an Erasmus Mundus program, shares a success story of a small village taking big steps to adapt to and mitigate climate change in his native India (full story at http://bit.ly/38tc9F7).
Read More...
Comments

Forests and Wetlands Are Water Infrastructure. New Green Bond Helps Finance Their Protection

This article was written by Todd Gartner, Manager of WRI's Natural Infrastructure for Water, and John Matthews, AGWA's Coordinator.
---

East Africa’s Kariba Dam is almost empty due to diminishing rains. In Brazil, Sao Paulo’s reservoirs were reduced to dried mud three years ago, and experts say the city is heading toward another dry spell. Catastrophic floods recently wreaked havoc in southern England, Texas and Bangkok.

These are not simply one-off events; they represent systemic failures in water infrastructure development — failures that are increasing in frequency and severity as Earth’s climate shifts.

A new financial mechanism—“green bonds” that pay for using ecosystems as “natural infrastructure” for clean, ample water—can help.

To find out more about the Water Infrastructure Criteria of the Climate Bonds Standard, read the
Joint Press Release in the AGWA Blog or visit CBI's website. From there you can download the Standard and other helpful documents. Read More...
Comments